Art Palestine International is a New York-based cultural organization dedicated to Palestinian contemporary art. We collaborate with museums, galleries, and non-profits to produce art exhibitions, events, and publications.


This blog is a research tool that allows us to chart our research and invite others along on the journey.





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Larissa Sansour in The National

Just came across this article–very exciting!  Larissa Sansour’s new venture with Oreet Ashery is in The National.

The First Palestinian on the Moon

Larissa Sansour
A Space Exodus

Dates:
January 8 – February 7, 2010
Opening:
Friday, Sept 8, 7–9pm
Location:
487 Driggs Ave, bet N. 9 and N. 10
Directions:
Click here
Hours:
Thurs–Mon, 12–6pm
Webpage: http://www.jackthepelicanpresents.com/sansour.html

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The Novel of Nonel and Vovel

Cover art, The Novel of Nonel and Vovel, credit:  Oreet Ashery and Larissa Sansour

Artists Oreet Ashery (a Israeli artist working in London) and Larissa Sansour (a Palestinian artist living in Copenhagen) collaborated to publish this new graphic novel, which promises:

“a bold mixture of art, politics, games, sci-fi, storytelling and other experiments – all rattling and shaking up the most prevalent ideas, stereotypes and misconceptions of the Middle East.”

“The Novel of Nonel and Vovel” tells the story of two super-power artists (the artists’ alter egos), 50 ninja woman, and a mission to save Palestine. Published earlier this year, the novel is available for purchase on the publisher’s website.

Caption: Cover art, The Novel of Nonel and Vovel, credit:  Oreet Ashery and Larissa Sansour

Larissa Sansour, Soup Over Bethlehem

It’s Friday night and I’m just about to go out to dinner with my friends. To warm up, I watched this video by Larissa Sansour. Called Soup Over Bethlehem, it’s a 9-minute piece about a group of friends having dinner in Bethlehem. They start out by talking about a Palestinian national dish, mloukhieh, and the conversation evolves into politics, mobility and occupation.

My favorite line of the video: ‘I’m so occupied these days.’ Response, ‘Aren’t we all.’

In the video they say that non-Arabs never like mloukieh because of the bitterness, but I checked out the recipe and it seems to be gluten free… always a plus for us celiacs.

Palestinian Artists in Istanbul Biennial

It’s a big year for Palestinian artists on the biennial circuit. A couple weeks late, but I just noticed that there are a few familiar names on the roster for the Istanbul Biennial, opening September 12: Jumana Abboud, decolonizing.ps (Sandi Hilal, Alessandro Pettit and Eyal Weizman), and Wafa Hourani will all be taking part.

UPDATE: Not sure how I missed this, but Larissa Sansour is also on the list.

Mapping Palestine at Art Dubai

Hot on the heels of Monday’s announcement of a Palestine pavilion at Venice, Art Dubai has announced that it will present a project called ‘Mapping Palestine’ as part of this year’s fair, which takes place 18-21 March. The project, curated by Samar Martha of ArtSchool Palestine, includes an exhibition of 2D works,  a video exhibition, and a series of presentations by arts organizations based in Palestine.

Here’s a list of artists from the ArtSchool Palestine website:

The first project, Akhir al Layl “at the end of the night”, derived from a poem by the late Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish, exhibits a range of two-dimensional works by artists living and working in Palestine and the diaspora including Sama Alshaibi, Rana Bishara, Tarek Al Ghoussein, Raouf Haj Yihya,  Rula Halawani, Alexandra Handal, Shuruq Harb, Mona Hatoum, Yazan Khalili, Jawad Al Malhi, Ahlam Shibli and Sharif Waked.

The second project, Tamam, is a programme of video art and includes work by Alexandra Handal, Annemarie Jacir, Sharif Waked, Larissa Sansour and Enas Muthafar amongst others. Tamam is an Arabic word meaning ‘everything is fine’.  But under the harsh reality of occupation, can things be fine and normal? Ironically, each of the selected artists portrays in their work the harshness of life under occupation and its absurdity. In a sometimes sarcastic manner, their work highlights some of the aspects of daily life under occupation.

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